Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Fact of the Day: Kanji and Hanzi

The elegant Japanese letters known as Kanji (漢字) were taken directly from China's Hanzi (漢字) symbolic characters. Hanzi characters first came into Japan through imported goods from China such as coins, swords, mirrors, and letters. Their first use in Japan was by the Imperial Court, but were originally written and read in Chinese as Japan had no writing system at the time. Over the course of several hundred years, kanji evolved to be read in Japanese, and Japan even created their own unique characters

19 comments:

  1. Knowledge for the day:)
    Have a nice week ahead Adam.

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  2. No kidding? I knew kanji came from China but I didn't know the history of it. wow!

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  3. Good info. I read it to my daughter and she thought it was also neat.

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  4. Always interesting facts, Adam!



    ALOHA from Honolulu
    Comfort Spiral
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  5. wow that's a very very interesting historical fact

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  6. Interesting! I didn´t know both writing sytems were related. Kisses:)

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  7. Yes, that's correct...Japanese writing originally came from China.

    Many Japanese kanji is different these days from the Chinese counterpart.

    And Japanese grammar is completely different from Chinese, so it was necessary to make the hiragana characters.

    And then the Japanese katakana characters were made for non-Japanese words (and also to be used as a type of italics).

    Anyways...please check my blog:
    http://tokyo5.wordpress.com/

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  8. The things you learn in blogland! Thanks for sharing this interesting fact :)

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  9. LOL @ John's comment!

    Happy Tuesday.

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  10. Thanks for sweet comments You have very interesting post!
    http://afinaskaterblogspotcom.blogspot.ru/

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  11. Great post!

    http://www.cultureandtrend.com/

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  12. It looks so confusing to me! Almost an art form in itself.

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