Sunday, April 27, 2014

Fact of the Day: Quince Pear

The pear-shaped fruit quince are commonly produced in Argentina, but remain somewhat unknown to most people in the United States. Despite its rareness in North America, it's closely related to pears and apples. All three are members of the Rosaceae (Rose) family of plants. 

18 comments:

  1. In my country this fruit is very common and my mum makes a delicious "jam" with them. Kisses:)

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  2. There is one beautiful quince plant/tree? It's been kept as a big bush where I am at the moment!! It has beautiful blooms too!! Yay! Take care
    x

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  3. i am not sure if i have tasted this but i'm sure this is delish as the pears and apples. :)

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  4. I think there's a reference to quince in that old poem "The Owl and the Pussycat," isn't there? Apart from that, it's unknown to me.

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  5. Can't recall this tree. Sounds interesting.

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  6. I've never enjoyed one of these, and have this experience to look forward to.

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  7. I've heard of it but never sounded very appetizing

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  8. so interesting what I ve just red!!!
    xx

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  9. They are popular in Germany for making jam or juice!

    -Kati

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  10. Serbia is one of the two biggest producers of quinces in the world. It's popular fruit here in Europe, not for fresh eating (you can't eat them fresh) but for cooking and cakes

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  11. These are widely used in Sicily, very traditional. My mother knows how to eat them!

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  12. Very interesting, I have heard of them and think I have seen them sold but have never eaten one.

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  13. I've never tasted a quince, I must.

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  14. I didn't know it was rare! We have quince trees in Nova Scotia where my extended family lives. My sister Barb has one in the yard of her summer home. I've had lots of yummy quince jam. Have a good one, Adam!

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