Sunday, February 14, 2016

Question: Should Schools Still Teach Cursive?

I had always thought that pretty much every school in the United States taught cursive hand-writing, but I hear that many schools don't. I remember learning it in elementary school, and it was not an easy thing to master or even get sorta close to good. I think it should be taught, just because it's only real purpose is for a person to be able to sign their name. However if you look at some people's penmanship, some don't even try to make any of the letters legible. Some people say it's to "read historical documents" but almost all of them can be easily found in standard text. 

Do you think cursive hand-writing is still important? 

20 comments:

  1. Oh YES, I do! And not only for people to be able to write their name, but also to express yourself in a real personal style; your own handwriting expresses your personality too, I think.
    Cheers,

    Jeanneke.

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    1. Yes - TOTALLY agree with Jeanneke.
      Gives personal style - who wants to be a bloody human robot.
      So my answer is - YES.

      Colin

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  2. Yes, I do. Just because most everyone uses devices that print out the words for you doesn't mean that we should let cursive writing go by the wayside. I'm still asked to sign my name on documents and packages. What are these kids going to do when asked to sing their names?

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  3. I do think it's very important. My kids' school still teaches it, but not many does. I guess because most people nowadays type instead actually writing reports?

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  4. It should be taught. The Art of writing can tell so much about the writer. Print doesn't.
    We don't want people signing with an 'X' as they did in the olden days, when people couldn't read or write.

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  5. Yes, but I might just be falling into the trap of, "I learned, so everyone else should have to, too."

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  6. It may be going the way of the dinosaur, but I'm glad my kids learned cursive. You're right at least they can sign their signature.

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  7. I agree that it should still be taught. Cursive can be beautiful. In a way I think of writing as an art. My mom taught me the basic cursive, and from that, as I grew older, I developed my own personal style. It shouldn't be forgotten any more than any other art form.

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  8. It should still be taught for many reasons:
    ~Handwriting Identification is similar to fingerprinting; each person's handwriting is unique.
    ~Manual Dexterity
    ~Personal Artistic-Like Expression
    ~A signature is more difficult to copy than a printed name so it is more secure on checks and legal documents

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  9. Learning it won't hurt anyone. I'm with John M.

    Happy Valentine, Adam!

    Blue

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  10. Yes, even though I tend to block print when I write.

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  11. I think it should be taught. Everyone needs a personal signature. But then again, if kids do not learn it, then one day we can have secret senior messages. Ha!
    Lisa

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    1. Heh! That's a great way of looking at it! :)

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  12. Yes, I think it should continue to be taught. It has its own important uses.

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  13. My older daughter was taught in school. By the time my younger daughter got to school, they stopped teaching it here, which made me sad. I think it's important for signatures, and it makes writing so much faster than print.

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  14. In today's computerized world, it does seem a bit horse-and-buggy-ish. Yet I do love cursive writing and I think the world will be poorer without it.

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  15. It's very important! They shouldn't take it away. It's not old English!

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  16. Yes, it's important to keep teaching it ...

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  17. we still make kids write in cursive their essays and homeworks, they do not use computers

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