Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Fact of the Day: Lambert Simnel

Lambert Simnel was a boy who was picked by a priest named Richard Simon to pretend to be King Edward IV's nephew Edward Plantagenet, 17th Earl of Warwick. If this had been true, he would have been a serious rival to the throne on the Yorkist side of the War of the Roses and serious threat to the Tudor king Henry VII. This charade was eventually suppressed, since Simon was a priest he was not killed but rather imprisoned. King Henry VII most likely saw Simnel as a pawn too young to realize what he was doing, and had him pardoned then he was given a job by the royal household.    

9 comments:

  1. One way to up his status after a jail stint

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  2. Man....history was as crazy then as it is now:P

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  3. Wow! They were really serious about their politics for sure. Hugs...RO

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  4. Kudos to King Henry VII. He sounds more compassionate and less vindictive than most of the rulers we hear about from that time.
    Great post, Adam.

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    1. Given that he had more reason than any other king to destroy his enemies (his right was by conquest, his claim by birth was weak, though he married King Edward IV's daughter and their children had a much stronger claim to cement) he was pretty fair. His son Henry VIII killed far more people even if you discount the dissenters in the break with the Catholic church

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  5. I remember reading this and feeling so sorry for that kid..

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  6. Seems like every another plot for a tv show or movie.

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