Tuesday, January 24, 2012

A Look Into History: John Wilkes Booth


John Wilkes Booth was an American actor who later became the assassin of Abraham Lincoln. 




Growing up Booth was thought to be very athletic and intelligent. He decided to pick up the family work of acting. 
 

Booth later supported the Confederacy and hated Lincoln. His family was rather split on the issue, causing a lot of drama for him. 


 Even though he was known for being a famous actor, he was sincere on his political beliefs. He once thought to kidnap Lincoln, but once the Confederacy had fallen, he changed his plan to murder.

While the President was watching a play in Ford's theater, Booth had begun his plot. He cleverly hid out and to his luck a policeman/bodyguard left his post for most of the day. Booth knew every line of the play, and waited for the right moment to shoot Lincoln in the back of the head. He then escaped, stabbing a pursuer and making a dramatic entry out.


Lincoln did not die right away, instead he was carried to a nearby house with a team of doctors. However he was too badly wounded, and there was nothing they could do on his deathbed. The nation had lost a great leader. 


 While Booth was carrying out his plan, his buddy George Atzerodt was tasked with the assassination of Vice President Andrew Johnson. However Atzerodt instead decided not to, and just drank his troubles away. He was later hanged for his role in their plot.


Booth ran off to the Garret Farmhouse, and Union troops eventually found him and surrounded the place. He was ordered to surrender, but declared he would not be taken alive. He ran out of the back door with weapons, and was then shot by a union solider. Booth was dragged on the porch steps and died about 2 hours later.

2 comments:

  1. Wow. So much I didn't know about this infamous man.

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  2. I wrote a report on this guy for my American History class. Had fun doing it too. Booth is a interesting guy I think. Not that I condone his assassination lol but you get me I hope

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