Saturday, February 23, 2013

Fact of the Day: Tale of the First Novel

The first novel in the world is generally believed to be The Tale of Genji written in the 11th century somewhere between the year 1000 to 1012. The author was a poet named Murasaki Shikibu, though it is only a nick-name. Her real name is unknown. 

16 comments:

Aunt Mary said...

That is really an interesting fact Adam and I mean it .
Thanks for sharing.

joy said...

Oh my! I wish I could write one too:) have a nice day Adam:)

DWei said...

Maybe that was her real name and not a nickname!

RaeAbigael said...

nice fact! I've heard about the tale of Genji before but I really have no idea what it's about!

xoxo,
Rae \(^o^)/
Raellarina - The Ballerina on Fire

Blue Grumpster said...

Great... now I have to try and buy it.

Dana said...

Author of the first novel: that would be a cool distinction to have!

Pat Hatt said...

Wow with so many out now a days hard to imagine just one

Christine said...

that's a long time ago!

MEcoy said...

thats freakin cool! too bad there wasn't too much information about it

DEZMOND said...

that is interesting

Pilar Domínguez said...

I thought you were going to make a sum up of this tale, ohhh, heheh. Very interesting, Adam. Kisses and nice weekend:)

Plowing Through Life (Martha) said...

That is a long time ago!

Elisabeth said...

Lovely post! Thank you for leaving a comment on my blog!

xxx
E from Helsinki
http://dragonflyelisabeth.blogspot.fi/

Kezzie said...

Ooh, how interesting! I'd never even thought about what was, where or when the first novel was written!

Kay said...

This might be TMI, but I got this from Wikipedia:

The Tale of Genji (源氏物語 Genji Monogatari) is a classic work of Japanese literature written by the Japanese noblewoman and lady-in-waiting Murasaki Shikibu in the early years of the 11th century, around the peak of the Heian period. It is sometimes called the world's first novel, the first modern novel, the first psychological novel or the first novel still to be considered a classic. Notably, the novel also illustrates a unique depiction of the livelihoods of high courtiers during the Heian period.[1] While universally considered a masterpiece, its precise classification and influence in both Western and Eastern canon has been a matter of debate.

My husband tried to read it, but I've noticed that he's ummmm... given up. There's a lot of Japanese movies about this work. Hmmmm... Murasaki means purple and that happens to be my favorite color. :-)

Adam said...

I hear it's hard to find a great translation. Either in English or modern Japanese.