Monday, March 18, 2013

Fact of the Day: Jefferson-Adams Feud

After losing re-election, John Adams' friendship towards his successor Thomas Jefferson became strained for various political reasons. He did not attend Jefferson's inauguration though the two later became friends again in their retirement.

19 comments:

  1. I've heard varying things about how strained (or not) their relationship was.

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  2. In politics, it always happen that way. Friends, enemies, friends, enemies and friends again

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  4. I guess they wanted to make peace in their old age.

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  5. Great that they could mend their relationship.

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  6. Seems the way with politics.

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  7. Two people losing their friendship over politics? I've never heard such a thing. :)

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  8. Poor loser? Glad they kissed and made up later in life. :)

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  9. Guess life hasn't changed much since our forefathers hey?

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  10. it proves that true friendship is forever, even to distance for a while!

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  11. Definitely a sore loser! Though I am glad to hear they were able to patch things up :)

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  12. I'm glad these two grumpy old men made up!

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  13. Glad they became friends afterwards!

    betty

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  14. In today's day and age of political rancor, I take some small comfort that it's been like that since the founding of the Republic. Adams (who I believe had a SERIOUS inferiority complex) and Jefferson, Hamilton and Burr, Jackson and...John Quincy Adam...we've been pissing and moaning at each other for over 200 years.
    And I think it's cool that Adams and Jefferson died on the same 4th of July (not cool that they died, cool that they passed on Independence Day).

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