Tuesday, May 7, 2013

Fact of the Day: Separation of Church and State

In debates on the separation of church and state, those in favor of faith/church getting into government often cite the term "separation of church and state" does not appear in the Constitution.  The major reason for this is that Thomas Jefferson himself coined the term in a letter to Baptists which were published in a newspaper in reference to the 1st amendment.

Here are his exact words "Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between Man & his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legitimate powers of government reach actions only, & not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should "make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof", thus building a wall of separation between Church & State."

10 comments:

  1. as for a catholic country like ours we are having that same issue too

    ReplyDelete
  2. I didn't know this. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Great one, my dear ^__^

    Kisses,

    Nico

    www.nicoleta.me

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wonderful!!! Great bit of trivia here and I always love learning these.

    ReplyDelete
  5. That's the first time I hear this. Very interesting. I'm in favour of religion and state being completely separate. Government is for all, religion is for whoever follows it.

    ReplyDelete
  6. This is near and dear to my heart and so very interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  7. There is no separation of church and state anyway in the United States. And what I mean by that is it's impossible. Religion and politics are so entwined with each other that it is an absolutely ridiculous concept to even suggest "let's keep religion and politics separate?" Yeah right. Sigh.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I like reading your American History posts, Adam. Brings me back memories of school, and it's always good to be knowledgable about the past.

    ReplyDelete