Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Fact of the Day: Rock of Language

In 1799 the French army discovered the Rosetta Stone, which had words written in both two forms of Egyptian and Ancient Greek. Its discovery led to a modern understanding of Egyptian hieroglyphs. 

21 comments:

  1. It's great, the Egyptian hieroglyphs.

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  2. The Rosetta Stone is at the British Museum now. When we went there many years ago I was surprised that it wasn't cordoned off or in some sort of protective casing. I talked to the guard about it and he said we could touch it. I was amazed. I did actually touch the Rosetta Stone.

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  3. And all this time I thought it was just an infomercial to learn a foreign language.

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  4. I swear I had no idea that this is what the Rosetta Stone was. Yet another reason I love this blog.

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  5. they probably still haven't returned it to Egypt

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  6. This fact made me remember Sherlock Holmes cartoons and his stories, heheheeh. Great discovering! Kisses:)

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  7. I never knew it was an actual thing, either! Thanks, Adam!

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  8. Great information. Can we follow each other on GFC, Bloglovin, FB or Twitter? Love
    New Post Fashion Talks

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  9. Hi Adam! Loved the photo of Little Iz "reading." How wonderful that you read to her. It is so important to share the pleasure of reading with our little ones. As a teacher I can see that she already is orienting a book correctly and is engaged with the pages! Yeah! Terry and I are planning to go to London (UK) in June. Seeing the Rosetta Stone at the British Museum is very high on my list. I was fascinated with the RS from early on. I saw a replica of the stone at an Egyptian exhibit in Denver, but that can't begin to compare with seeing the real stone. Thanks for this post!

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  10. I actually wanted to learn Egyptian hieroglyph when I was younger....for realz!

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  11. Finding the clue to reading hieroglyphics might be the only benefit of Napoleon's disastrous Egyptian campaign.

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  12. You amaze me at how much research you do. I know you cannot remember all that. I learn something every time I visit,

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