Sunday, January 11, 2015

Fact of the Day: Utnapishtim's Ark

Cuneiform was one of the earliest forms of writing in human history, and many stories were written in it. The most famous was one of the earliest, the Epic of Gilgamesh. Gilgamesh was Hercules-like character who had many adventures and was also a king. In the story, Gilgamesh meets an ancient man named Utnapishtim who told him that the god Enki had tasked him in making a boat to survive a world-wide flood that wiped out everything that was not on the ship.

20 comments:

Joy said...

Nice to know!

Kay said...

Gracious! This is very interesting!

Bob Bushell said...

So, where was Noah?

Kati said...

Hmm, sounds familiar....doesn't it?

-Kati

Margaret-whiteangel said...

Very interesting that..

Emmylou said...

Good timing on this post, Adam. I just started watching Noah on Netflix:D (haven't finished it yet though)

DEZMOND said...

I remember writing essays on both of them in high school, got an A of course :)

bj said...

Very interesting.

Holy Ghost Writer said...

Guess Noah came later

Pat Hatt said...

Have to be one sturdy boat

Elisabeth said...

Interesting, so the story about Noah came only later? Thanks for stopping by my blog Adam :)

xxx
E from Helsinki, Finland
http://dragonflyelisabeth.blogspot.fi/

Plowing Through Life (Martha) said...

A very interesting bit of info!

Julie Ann Lozada said...

hmm... interesting story, wanna read that!

It’s a GIRL Thing

Dixie@dcrelief said...

One of many accounts... so there must have been a flood. But what was considered "world wide" back then?

Sandra Cox said...

Thanks for sharing this information, Adam. I did not know that. So there is more than just one version of this Very interesting. Sounds like there was a natural disaster at some point.

FilipBlog said...

That's a strange drawing of the ark. Special.

Greetings,
Filip

Dascha said...

Love to read these interesting facts!

xoxo
www.its-dash.com

stephen Hayes said...

Sounds familiar, doesn't it? Another reason to accept the Bible as a collection of moral stories and not something to be taken literally.

Christine said...

interesting...these early stories are all related somehow.

Adam said...

probably a half-mile. it was the bronze age after all