Thursday, August 6, 2015

Fact of the Day: Judicial Education

In 1954, in the case of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that racially-segregated schools were unconstitutional which were mainly enforced in the Southern United States. Conservative politicians across the South signed a document known as the Southern Manifesto which tried to defy the court ruling claiming that it was "clear abuse of judicial power" and saying it was in their power of "states rights" to keep the terrible tradition. Some Southern politicians like Albert Gore Sr. and Lyndon B. Johnson refused to sign the racist political stunt. 

10 comments:

Kay said...

I'm happy to know that about Gore and Johnson.

Moscow Blogger said...

interesting

Saucy Siciliana said...

I remember Johnson.

Caramella said...

Thank you for the information, I knew Gore but not Johnson.

Plowing Through Life (Martha) said...

Interesting info!

Pat Hatt said...

Remembering hearing about Gore, but never knew Johnson did as well.

Margaret D said...

Learning all the time...

Kati said...

What a terrible tradition, good it was stopped.

-Kati

stephen Hayes said...

Many people, such as the two you mentioned, showed real profiles of courage.

bj said...

Very interesting, Adam...