Saturday, February 2, 2019

Fact of the Day: Mile

The English word mile comes from the Latin word mille meaning "thousand". Roman soldiers would often mark distances of a "thousand paces". 

9 comments:

Christine said...

Interesting.

Sakuranko said...

Oh very interesting sweetheart
xx

Bob Bushell said...

Great.

Pat Hatt said...

Sure a lot of walking

RO said...

I remember having to jog a mile nonstop as a kid in the Air Force, and it was easy. Today, I'd be lucky to get in 10 steps.(lol) Great fact for today Adam. Happy Saturday! RO

Sandra Cox said...

Fun factoid, Adam.

Kirk said...

So that's a thousand paces to the gallon.

Huggybear said...

Isn't it time for the USA to drag it's way into the 21st Century
and changed to kilometres ( and that is the correct spelling of the word!)?
Your two UNFORTUNATELY located neighbours have KLMS!
For the non-geographical followers - these two sovereign countries are Canada and Mexico. Seemingly now with leaders who are not at the top of the friendship tree with the "what is it now - "a wall, a fence, a barrier, spikes in the ground or a bloody pipe dream" of that loathesome clown in 1600 Penn Avenue????
Colin

Fundy Blue said...

When I was mapping in the field as a geologist my pace was a pretty consistent five feet, so it's fun to think I came close to the Roman pacing.