Friday, November 8, 2019

Fact of the Day: Shakespeare in a Pickle

The phrase "in a pickle" was first used in a play by William Shakespeare. Though he probably borrowed it from a Dutch phrase. Both in Dutch and English in Shakespeare's time meant to be in a state of drunkeness. 

7 comments:

  1. Wow! Had no idea that the phrase had to do with being inebriated. Very interesting. Hugs, RO

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  2. He was probably pickled when he wrote it.

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  3. Pickled is still in the LAND OF OZ ( How I detest that stupid phrase) used to describe a state of intoxication.
    I have been pickled quite a few times in my youthful days......it is the aftermath of the pickled process that is painful - ha ha!
    Colin

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  4. Sure not used just for drunks now

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    Replies
    1. Are you suggesting that mess in Donald's cabinet and his advisers?
      That is beyond the pickled stage!
      Colin

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  5. Well, I have heard "pickled" as a synonym for drunk, but not "in a pickle", which is usually the same as "in a jam". Hmm, was "jammed" once a synonym for drunk? I'll have to start reading through Shakespeare and find out.

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